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This Library book discussion group meets at noon on the fourth Wednesday of each month and is always open to new members. The group selects the books for discussion, which are available at the check-out desk during the month preceding the discussion. Volunteers from among the group lead the discussion, with background materials supplied by the librarian. Bring your own lunch or snack; the Library provides beverages.

Titles for upcoming months are:

September 27

The Sympathizer

by Viet Thanh Nguyen

The SympathizerWinner of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize in fiction and the Carnegie Medal for excellence in fiction, The Sympathizer is the first novel by author Viet Thanh Nguyen.  Critics and readers were equally enthusiastic about this fresh take on the “Vietnam War novel.”  Told from the perspective of an unnamed Captain in the South Vietnamese army who escapes to America after the fall of Saigon, The Sympathizer is equal parts; literary, philosophical, darkly comedic, coming-of-age, spy novel.  What more could you ask for?   “Both chilling and funny, and a worthy addition to the library of first-rate novels about the Vietnam War.” –Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

 

 

 

October 25

Our Souls at Night

by Kent Haruf

Our Souls at NightWhile debut novels can be exciting, final novels can be even more poignant and reflective.  Such is the case with Our Souls at Night, the final last novel by well-known author Kent Haruf (The Ties that Bind) before is passing.  Set in Colorado, widow Addie and widower Louis are neighbors who’ve been friends for years but life may still have more in store for each of them.  Look for the movie adaptation coming soon starring Robert Redford and Jane Fonda.  “…such a tender, carefully polished work that it seems like a blessing we had no right to expect.” – Washington Post

 

 

 

November 22

X: a Novel

by Ilyasah Shabazz

X A NovelSelected by the Michigan Humanities Council at the 2017-18 Great Michigan Read.  “X:  A Novel is an engrossing tale of the arduous past of a civil rights leader, and a fine platform for engaging humanities programs and discussion across the state,” said Shelly Hendrick Kasprzycki, Executive Director.  The book explores the Michigan roots of Malcolm X, including the early life experiences, both good and bad, that molded him into one of the most prominent leaders of the twentieth century.  For more information visit: http://www.michiganhumanities.org/2017-18-great-michigan-read/