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Adult Book News

November 2018 LibraryReads List

The top ten books published this month that librarians across the country love.

library reads logo websiteThis monthly list is created by librarians and library staff to help connect readers to new books and authors. An online community of librarians vote each month on their favorite new books and the results are tallied. "The list is a straightforward calculation: whichever ten books get the most nominations go onto the monthly list. The book with the most nominations becomes the #1 Pick. It’s as simple as that." The list is not meant to be a "best" list - just a list of collective favorites - books librarians loved and want to share.

 

 

 

#1 for November:

My Sister, The Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite

"Sisters, sisters, there were never such devoted sisters..."  (Irving Berlin, White Christmas)

mysisterNigerian nurse, Korede, is bitter. How could she not be? Her sister, Ayoola, is many things: the favorite child, the beautiful one, and quite possibly sociopathic. And now Ayoola's third boyfriend in a row is dead. (Ayoola has a very inconvenient habit of killing her boyfriends.)  Korede is her sister's fixer. She knows the best solutions for cleaning blood, the trunk of her car is big enough for a body, and she keeps Ayoola from posting pictures of her dinner to Instagram when she should be mourning her "missing" boyfriend. Not that she gets any credit. Korede has long been in love with a kind, handsome doctor at the hospital where she works. She dreams of the day when he will realize that she's exactly what he needs. But when he asks Korede for Ayoola's phone number, she must reckon with what her sister has become and how far she's willing to go to protect her. "This is a darkly, darkly funny novel ... It strips away the romanticism of the complicated sisterly relationship but perfectly illustrates its complicated contradictions: Korede cannot stand Ayoola, but she would do anything for her." (Booklist

 

 

 


 

Anna Burns wins for Milkman

manbookerwinner2018On October 16, the Booker Foundation announced the winner of this year's Man Booker  Fiction Prize, one  of the most prestigious and lucrative of the literary prizes worldwide. This year's winner, Milkman by Anna Burns, is set in Northern Ireland during the Troubles, the civil strife between Protestants and Catholics that erupted in violence for decades.The story concerns a bookish young woman growing up in a city rife with factions who is pressured by an older, more powerful man with an unsettling interest in her, and tormented by the vicious tongues of her neighbours. It is about the misuse of power and about the pernicious effects of gossip and rumour. Author Burns is the 17th female winner in the prize’s 50-year history and the first Northern Irish writer to win. Although Milkman is her third novel, this is her first major prize. Kwame Anthony Appiah, 2018 Chair of the Judges Committee, comments: "None of us has ever read anything like this before. Anna Burns’ utterly distinctive voice challenges conventional thinking and form in surprising and immersive prose. It is a story of brutality, sexual encroachment and resistance threaded with mordant humour. Set in a society divided against itself, Milkman explores the insidious forms oppression can take in everyday life."

 

 


 

 

 


 

 

haunted house clip art eaceMbpT4On October 12, Netflix premiered a new series based on The Haunting of Hill House, Shirley Jackson's justly famous, definitive haunted house story. The book was a finalist for the National Book Award when it was published in 1959 and has been adapted for film twice. In Netflix's version, a fractured family returns to confront the haunting memories of their old home and the terrifying events that drove them from it years before. If, after bingeing on all ten hours, you are still in need of more haunted house horror, The New York Times has a list for you: 13 chilling novels centered around haunted houses. Horror staples like The Shining, The Amityville Horror, and The Turn of the Screw, are on the list, plus a few more recent titles. You may wish to lock your doors and windows and leave the lights on - all night!

 

 

From the List:

sladehouse2Slade House by David Mitchell
Down the road from a working-class British pub, along the brick wall of a narrow alley, if the conditions are exactly right, you'll find a small black iron door, the entrance to Slade House. A stranger will greet you by name and invite you inside. At first, you won't want to leave. Later, you'll find that you can't. Every nine years, the house's residents--an odd brother and sister--extend a unique invitation to someone who's different or lonely: a precocious teenager, a recently divorced policeman, a shy college student. But what really goes on inside Slade House? For those who find out, it's already too late. . . . "Expect this superb haunted-house tale to be read as a Halloween staple for years to come."(Booklist)

 

 

 


 

 

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we can do it thumbTHE GREAT AMERICAN READ on PBS is an eight-part series that explores and celebrates the power of reading, told through the prism of America’s 100 best-loved novels (as chosen in a national survey).  It investigates how and why writers create their fictional worlds, how we as readers are affected by these stories, and what these 100 different books have to say about our diverse nation and our shared human experience. All summer long, the public has been invited to vote, on The Great American Read website or on social media or using a toll free number, for the ultimate best-loved novel from the original list of 100. Voting ends this week, on October 18 at 11:59pm PT. The Grand Finale will be the October 23 episode (8pm on PBS) when the The Great American Read will celebrate all 100 books on the list, reveal the top voted titles in multiple categories, and unveil the novel that Americans have picked as their #1 best-loved book.

This is your chance to have your voice heard (about books, at least). You can take the quiz and check out the list of favorites - then cast your vote for the country's best loved book.

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 Mayor Oliver Wolcott has designated October 19, 2018 as Russell Kirk Day in Plymouth.

russellkirkOn  October 19, at 7 p.m. the Library will mark the 100th anniversary of the birth of Russell Kirk (1918-1994) in a special, after-hours event. Born and raised in Plymouth, Kirk was an influential and internationally known writer and speaker on conservative themes, best known for his groundbreaking histories, The Conservative Mind (1953) and The Roots of American Order (1974). In addition to his career as a political theorist, historian, social and literary critic, and conservative author, Kirk wrote fiction, specifically ghost stories. This seems an apppropriate enterprise for an author born in the month of Halloween! 

 

 

surlysullenThe Surley, Sullen Bell, ten stories and sketches, uncanny or uncomfortable, with a note on the Ghostly  Tale  by Russell Kirk

"Along with a brief defence of the art of writing ghost stories, this is an illustrated collection of a number of stories with varied backgrounds (decaying cities, old castles, neglected farms) and the style is old-fashioned, straightforward story telling. Yet there is perhaps too much commonsense reality in these tales for them to be truly terrifying. In the first story, one of the stronger ones, a man finds the girl he once loved the slow poison victim of her husband but is unable to save her. In the several ghost stories, the ghosts generally work for the good to defeat the modern evils of city planners, hoodlums or census takers. In the stories about Mr. Kirk's own really desolate Michigan back country, his concept of ghosts becomes plainer still. Based often on real eccentrics, they represent all that is old, untamed and unnatural in human nature and they return both to torment and to taunt men too civilized to believe in dark powers. This concept, while sound, does not represent the truly supernatural and Mr. Kirk's feelings about ghosts tend to be stronger than the ghosts themselves." (Kirkus Review)