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Adult Book News

Barnes & Noble Book Club Featuring The Female Persuasion by Meg Wolitzer

B&N has recently announced the launch of a brand new, in real-time, book club. The Barnes & Noble Book Club's first meeting will be on May 2 at 6pm with hosted book discussions at all 630 stores in all 50 states. The book club is free and open to the public, and the first selection is Meg Wolitzer's new book, The Female Persuasion. One signed copy of the book will be given away at all locations. Our local store at 17111 Haggerty Rd. Northville, MI 48168 (248-348-0696) is participating.

femalepersuasionThe  Female Persuasion by Meg Wolitzer
Greer Kadetsky is a shy college freshman when she meets the woman she hopes will change her life. Faith Frank, dazzlingly persuasive and elegant at sixty-three, has been a central pillar of the women's movement for decades, a figure who inspires others to influence the world. Upon hearing Faith speak for the first time, Greer- madly in love with her boyfriend, Cory, but still full of longing for an ambition that she can't quite place- feels her inner world light up. And then, astonishingly, Faith invites Greer to make something out of that sense of purpose, leading Greer down the most exciting path of her life  and away from her meant-to-be love story with Cory and the future she'd always imagined. Greer is thrilled to land a job with Frank’s foundation—but when her new life begins to crumble around her, Greer finds herself reevaluating her entire worldview, including her understanding of Frank and of what it means to be a feminist in the modern age. "Sweeping yet intimate, Wolitzer's timely saga places her characters at the heart of a new wave of feminism, one clinging to the old paradigms of protest while encompassing current politics of personal responsibility. In a complex web of friends, lovers, mentors, and rivals, Wolitzer compassionately and artfully discerns the subtle strengths at the core of these essential connections." (Booklist)

 

 

 


 

guernseyThe Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows

After a long gestation, the movie version of this popular 2008 book by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows, finally hits the screen today, April 20. This charming story with surprising depth is set in 1946 England in the aftermath of World War II and is written in the epistolary style, composed of letters from one character to another. Writer Juliet Ashton is looking for her next book subject. She finds it in a letter from a man she's never met, a native of the Channel island of Guernsey, who has come across her name written inside a book by Charles Lamb. As Juliet and her new correspondent exchange letters, Juliet is drawn into the world of this man and his friends--and what a wonderfully eccentric world it is. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society--born as a spur-of-the-moment cover when its members were discovered breaking curfew during the German occupation of their island--boasts a charming, funny, deeply human cast of characters, from pig farmers to phrenologists, literature lovers all. Ashton also learns that Elizabeth McKenna, the beloved founder of the Society, was arrested and sent to a prison in France by the Germans and has yet to return home. The members of the Society are raising her child, Kit, among themselves until Elizabeth returns. Juliet begins a remarkable correspondence with the society's members, learning about their island, their taste in books, and the impact the recent German occupation has had on their lives. Captivated by their stories, she sets sail for Guernsey, and what she finds will change her forever.

Although the book's authors are American, the movie is a British production and stars a host of British actors known for British historical dramas: Lily James (Downton Abbey) as Juliet and Jessica Brown Findlay (Downtown Abbey) as Elizabeth, with other Downton Abbey alums, Matthew Goode (The Crown), and Penelope Wilton (Best Exotic Marigold Hotel).

 

 


 

Less by Andrew Sean Greer

Yesterday, April 16, 2018, the 102nd class of Pulitzer Prize winners was announced. The first prizes honoring excellence in journalism and the arts were pulitzer2untitledawarded in 1917 for work done in 1916; the prizes were established by publisher Joseph Pulitzer through a bequest in his will. The Prizes are for more than just journalists - it is also one of the most coveted awards in the literary world (and Kendrick Lamar just won the Pulitzer Prize for Music).

 

lessWho says you can't run away from your problems? You are a failed novelist about to turn fifty. A wedding invitation arrives in the mail: your boyfriend of the past nine years is engaged to someone else. You can't say yes--it would be too awkward--and you can't say no--it would look like defeat. On your desk are a series of invitations to half-baked literary events around the world. One way to skip town? You accept them all. What would possibly go wrong? Arthur Less will almost fall in love in Paris, almost fall to his death in Berlin, barely escape to a Moroccan ski chalet from a Saharan sandstorm, accidentally book himself as the (only) writer-in-residence at a Christian Retreat Center in Southern India, and encounter, on a desert island in the Arabian Sea, the last person on Earth he wants to face. Somewhere in there: he will turn fifty. Through it all, there is his first love. And there is his last. Because, despite all these mishaps, missteps, misunderstandings and mistakes, Less is, above all, a love story. "Less is a wondrous achievement, deserving an even larger audience than Greer's best-selling The Confessions of Max Tivoli." (Booklist)

 

 


 

metroauthor

Metro Detroit Book and Author Luncheon - Monday, May 21, 2018

The 92nd Metro Detroit Book and Author Society Luncheon will be held on Monday, May 21 at the Burton Manor in Livonia. Ticket sales began on April 2, by phone at 586-685-5750, ext. 102 or online at www.bookandauthor.info. Tickets sales will end on May 18. Featured authors this spring are Michael Hodges, Jessica Knoll, Tiya Miles, and Dani Shapiro.

The Metro-Detroit Book & Author Society was created for the sole purpose of presenting a luncheon featuring major national authors. The Society strives to present top national authors in a comfortable, casual setting, with an opportunity to buy signed books and meet the authors. Guest authors have included Bonnie Jo Campbell, David Maraniss, Stephen King, James Patterson, Mary Higgins Clark, Barbara Taylor Bradford, Michael Connelly, Greg Isles, Kathy Reich, Erik Larson, C.J. Box, Randy Wayne White, and Debbie Macomber. The Metro-Detroit Book & Author luncheons are considered one of the largest and best one-day author events in the country.

 

 


 

This year, Holocaust Remembrance Day, or Yom Ha Shoah in Hebrew, marks the 75th anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising was the 1943 act of Jewish resistance that arose within the Warsaw Ghetto in German-occupied Poland during World War II, opposing Nazi Germany's final effort to transport the remaining Ghetto population to the Treblinka concentration camp. Holocaust Remembrance Day will be officially observed in the United States on Thursday, April 12, which corresponds to the  27th day of Nisan on the Hebrew calendar. 2018 also marks the 25th anniversary of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. The Museum was established as the result of a commission created in 1978 by President Jimmy Carter and led by Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel, as a “living memorial” that would honor the memory of the victims by teaching the lessons of the Holocaust to new generations.

Recognize the importance of remembrance:

boyinwinterA Boy in Winter by Rachel Sieffert
A startling portrait of the Nazis' arrival in Ukraine as they move to implement the final solution. Otto Pohl, an engineer overseeing construction of a German road in Ukraine, awakens to the unexpected sight of SS men herding hundreds of Jews into an old brick factory. Inside the factory, Ephraim anxiously scans the growing crowd, looking for his two sons. He can't quell the suspicion that it would be just like his oldest son, Yankel, to hole up somewhere instead of lining up for the Germans, and just like his youngest to follow. Yasia, a farmer's daughter who has come into town to sell produce, sees two young boys slinking through the shadows of the deserted streets and decides to offer them shelter. Yankel, with young Momik in tow, is determined to survive this. But to do so, he must throw in his lot with strangers. As their stories mesh, each of the characters comes to know the compromises demanded by survival, the oppressive power of fear, and the possibility of courage in the face of terror.